Collaborating with Student Partners on IQAP

The Department of Linguistics & Languages is going through the IQAP process in 2017-18.  I agreed to take on the undergraduate component of the self-study and set out to tackle the self-study as a SoTL project. When a colleague at the MacPherson Institute suggested recruiting student partners who would collaborate on the project, I jumped at the idea. The two student partners, Julia and Paige, ran focus groups with our in-course undergrads and conducted interviews with all our faculty members. They also analyzed all the data supplied by IRA.

In August 2017 we presented our findings to the department, so that the faculty can begin deliberating about enhancements and potential changes to the program in response. We identified some misalignments between the stated Program Learning Outcomes and the current course offerings, and offered suggestions for potential enhancements to courses that would address some student needs.

In November 2017, Paige and I gave a workshop about completing IQAP in partnership at the Research on Teaching and Learning (RTL) conference. In Winter 2018, the department finished its self-study report, to which Paige and Julia had made substantial contributions.  Paige and I are now working on a paper for submission to the International Journal for Students as Partners, which will document our experience working on the program review process in partnership.

Learning to Think Like Linguists

My paper, “Learning to think like linguists” was published in the Teaching Linguistics section of Language in 2016.

Language is the flagship journal of the Linguistic Society of America. In 2013, the journal launched a special section on Teaching Linguistics. My paper, “Learning to think like linguists: A think-aloud study of novice phonology students” was published in 2016.

Anderson, C. (2016). Learning to think like linguists: A think-aloud study of novice phonology students. Language, 92(4), e274–e291.

[external link] Learning to Think Like Linguists

[McMaster-internal link] Learning to Think Like Linguists

A key learning outcome for undergraduate linguistics courses is for students to learn to reason scientifically about language. This article presents the findings from a think-aloud study of undergraduates in an introductory linguistics course who were in the process of learning linguistic reasoning about phonology. I describe the students’ developing concepts and make recommendations for instructors to help students develop fully formed linguistics concepts and the ability to think scientifically about language.

Soul on Fire Podcast Series

A showcase for the stories of exemplary McMaster faculty.

Dr. Anne Wong in the Faculty of Health Sciences received a Forward With Integrity grant to create a podcast series, “Soul on Fire: Narratives that Inspire“. In Dr. Wong’s words, “This podcast series is a showcase for the stories of exemplary McMaster faculty. I hope that these narratives will inspire you and other members of our academic community to realize your own passions and academic potential.”

I was featured in the series in 2015. You can listen to my episode of the podcast here:

Conversation with Catherine Anderson

pic_soulonfire2